My work is an ongoing investigation of disintegration and decay, to understand life-cycles, origins and survival. My aim is to evoke deliberation of responsibility, deterioration and empathy. Collecting reclaimed items allows me to survey materiality and address the impact consumerism has on the earth-- specifically overproduction resulting in throwaway culture. I pursue deconstruction of objects for new uses, along with methods of meticulous layering, sequential connections and tension control. In an attempt to relocate value in the textile industry, I give agency to thread filaments, while investigating how the lifespan of fibers eventually degrades back into the earth.

My work is an ongoing investigation of disintegration and decay, to understand life-cycles, origins and survival. My aim is to evoke deliberation of responsibility, deterioration and empathy. Collecting reclaimed items allows me to survey materiality and address the impact consumerism has on the earth-- specifically overproduction resulting in throwaway culture. I pursue deconstruction of objects for new uses, along with methods of meticulous layering, sequential connections and tension control. In an attempt to relocate value in the textile industry, I give agency to thread filaments, while investigating how the lifespan of fibers eventually degrades back into the earth.


 

About

Caroline Borucki is a sculpture artist and slow fashion clothier who works with reclaimed materials, natural fibers and clay. Inspired by taxonomies of the natural world, she attempts to fuse relationships between humans and the earth-- regarding existence and decay.

Presently, she is building upon her interest in deterioration and waste, deciphering materiality at the Metro Transfer Site for the low-res Glean Artist Residency [2017]. She is an MFA candidate residing in Portland, Oregon for the Applied Craft + Design program, a collaborative program between Oregon College of Art and Craft and the Pacific Northwest College of Art.

Her small batch garments are a sustainable and ethical response to relocate value for the earth’s resources, and to acknowledge the human role in producing wearables. A native Chicagoan, she was recognized in print in the Best of the Chicago Reader 2013, as ‘Best New Maker.' in 2009, She was chosen to participate in the Driehaus Design Initiative Awards for Fashion Excellence, upon receiving a bachelor of arts from Dominican University.

 

[photo courtesy of cory malnarick]